Alice Springs

Country: Australia
Population:26,188
Time Zone:UTC+9:30
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The Museum of Central Australia
Central Australia's unique natural and geological history is explained at the Museum of Central Australia in Alice Springs. The evolution of the magnificent Central Australian landscape and the fascinating creatures that inhabited it, are described in the exhibitions. See meteorite fragments, fossils and interpretive displays as well as a replica of the ancient Alcoota waterhole. This internationally significant fossil site was home to giant freshwater crocodiles and the largest bird that ever lived. Contemporary Central Australia is explained in a display about the birds, mammals, reptiles and insects you will see as you tour the outback. The Museum of Central Australia also houses the Strehlow Research Centre, an important collection of film, sound, archival records and museum objects relating to Indigenous ceremonial life. The Strehlow Collection was accumulated by the Lutheran Pastor Carl Strehlow and his son Professor TGH Strehlow over two generations of anthropological research with the Aboriginal people of central Australia.
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Alice Springs Desert Park
Alice Springs Desert Park is an inspiring portrayal of Australia's desert environment that effortlessly blends the plants, animals and people of our arid regions. A 'must see' for every visitor to the Red Centre. Walk through three re-created desert habitats and discover how deserts are full of life. Stories of the desert are shared through interpretative displays, cultural presentations and guide activities. Do not miss Nature Theatre with free-flying birds of prey and other animals demonstrate their natural survival skills at the base of the MacDonnell Ranges. Spend some time in the Nocturnal House where you can spot rare or endangered mammals of the desert. Let your eyes adjust to the evening light and enjoy animals in their natural environment including the bilby, mala and thorny devil. At night, spotlight rare and endangered animals on the Nocturnal Tour. With an expert guide step into a predator proof enclosure in the foothills of the ranges and get up close with bilby, mala, echidna, brush tailed bettongs and other animals of the night.
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Alice Springs Telegraph Station
The Alice Springs Telegraph Station is a historic museum precinct, presenting the story of the connection of Australia to the rest of the world through Telegraph Communication in 1871. Since being declared protected as a Historical Reserve in 1963, it has become the best preserved Station along the Overland Telegraph Line. Guided tours of the heritage precinct run from March to November at 9:30am, 11:30am, 1:30pm & 3:30pm. Visit the original "Alice Spring" and learn about the origins of the town. Enjoy NT roasted coffee and homemade snacks at the Trail Station Wi-Fi Cafe and browse through the gift and souvenir shop and send a postcard from the towns original red Postbox.
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Alice Springs Reptile Centre
The Alice Springs Reptile Centre specialises in things that hiss and slither, which are rare, impossible, or undesirable to come across in the wild. Home to over 100 reptiles, the centre displays its inhabitants in recreations of their natural environment. Enter the Gecko Cave to see the different species of this diminutive and shy lizard from around Alice Springs, the Barkly Tablelands and the Top End. View Terry the Saltwater Crocodile through glass underground, that gives you a glimpse into his underwater world offering great photo opportunities. See huge Goannas such as the Perentie as well as the show off Frill-neck Lizards and desert-dwelling Thorny Devils. Handle a Python or see the Lizards being fed. Some of the world's most venomous snakes, including Inland Taipans, Brown Snakes, Death Adders and Mulga (King Brown) snakes are on display safely behind glass.
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Araluen Arts Centre
The Araluen Arts Centre is the focal point of the visual art and performance scene of Central Australia, presenting an annual program of exhibitions, performances, and film. Known as the keeping place of stories, Araluen holds within its spaces some of the most significant works of art in Central Australia and brings to the stage world class performances from around the nation (and at times the world). Literally built around a culturally significant 300 year old corkwood tree that now sits in the centre of the Sculpture Garden, the Araluen Arts Centre is the heart of the Araluen Cultural Precinct, which includes the Galleries and Theatre, the Museum of Central Australia including the Strehlow Research Centre, the Central Australian Aviation Museum, Central Craft, Yaye’s Café, and a host of significant public works of art and Arrernte sacred sites. The Araluen Galleries showcase the Contemporary Aboriginal art movement, particularly of Central Australia and the Western Desert Region as well as significant local contemporary artists. The Araluen Art Collection also includes original artworks by world renowned watercolourist Albert Namatjira. His artistic response to the breathtaking Central Australian landscapes are captured in this rotating collection.
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Kangaroo Sanctuary
The Kangaroo Sanctuary in Alice Springs is the home of Brolga and his mob of Kangaroos, as seen on ‘Kangaroo Dundee’ (BBC / Nat Geo documentary). It celebrates the beauty of the Red Kangaroo- an Australian icon. Brolga first established the baby kangaroo rescue centre in Alice Springs in 2005. He then went on to build his own wildlife sanctuary from 2009 to 2011. The Kangaroo Sanctuary’s mission is to educate and encourage people to rescue and care for kangaroos. Brolga has just started building Central Australia’s first wildlife hospital with the help of kind donations and from visitors on tours of the Sanctuary. Donations are welcome to help him continue his dream of completing the hospital and to care for the baby and adult kangaroos living at The Sanctuary.
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Uluru
The ancient red rock formations of Kata Tjuta rise from the dusty land to make an incredible sight in Central Australia. Witness the spectacular rocks as they appear to change colour and immerse yourself in the Aboriginal stories of this special place, 500 million years in the making. Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is jointly managed by its Anangu traditional owners and Parks Australia. Kata Tjuta is sacred to the Anangu people, who have inhabited the area for more than 22,000 years. The sandstone domes of Kata Tjuta are believed to be about 500 million years old
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Anzac Hill
The most visited landmark in Alice Springs, Anzac Hill is the ideal spot for an overview of the town. The lookout offers a panoramic view of Alice Springs and the beautiful surrounding ranges. The Anzac Hill Memorial was unveiled on 25 April 1934 (Anzac Day) and was originally dedicated to all those members of the armed services who had paid the supreme sacrifice during World War I. It has now become a memorial to all those who have served in the defence of their country during all wars in which Australia has participated. Facing the Gap, interesting and comprehensive interpretative signs border the lookout. These detail some of the local Arrentte people's creation stories, featuring the Yeperenye Caterpillar of the MacDonnell Ranges and Mparntwe (Alice Springs).
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Cactus Beach
On the western side of the Point are the world-famous Cactus and Castles beaches, and their surrounding surfing breaks. The Penong Road runs along the back of Cactus Beach, with a large camping area set amongst the dune scrub, between the road and beach, and good vehicle and foot access to the back of the beach. There is a small camp store, which provides the only commercial activity in the area. The beaches are 250 and 400 m long respectively. They face west and are backed by a low foredune, bordered by calcarenite bluffs and fronted by exposed beach rock and shallow calcarenite reefs. In the lee of the reefs is a narrow high tide sand beach, and while waves can be large on the outer reefs, they are usually less than 0.5 m when they finally reach the beach. However, both beaches are drained by strong permanent rips, particularly off Castles. In addition to the Cactus left and Castles right surf breaks off the beaches, to the south of Cactus out on Point Sinclair is Witzigs, Backdoors and Cunns, while off the north Castles bluff is Caves, Crushers and Supertubes. All the breaks are over calcarenite reefs and receive slight protection and cleaner waves owing to refraction around the point and over outer deeper reefs.
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Kakadu National Park
In Australia's biggest national park you'll find rugged escarpments, lush rainforest and rock art galleries up to 20,000 years old. Learn about Aboriginal culture from traditional owners the Bininj/Mungguy people, take in thundering waterfalls and witness millions of migratory birds among the wetlands. Experience Kakadu's magic in six dramatically different seasons.
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Wave Lagoon
Catch a wave at Darwin's coolest Waterfront attraction: the Wave Pool. Here, a palm-fringed swimming pool turns into a tube-riding, boogie-boarding bucket of fun when the siren signals the start of the swell. It is giggles galore in twenty minutes bursts as the waves send inflatable tubes bobbing about and boogie boards riding the crests. The swell here is gentle enough that there's little danger of wiping out (and there are no surfboards allowed) but there are red-and-yellow-clad surf lifeguards at the sidelines to keep everyone safe. In a lull, relax on banana lounges under enormous beach umbrellas, or spread out on the lawn in the shade. There are wading pools and fountains to keep wannabe grommets entertained, and a kiosk to keep the whole family in the supply of ice-creams and drinks.
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Crocosaurus Cove
Crocosaurus Cove, located in the heart of Darwin city, allows visitors a unique, up close and personal view of Australia’s iconic Saltwater Crocodiles. Bringing together some of the largest Saltwater Crocodiles in Australia & boasting the World’s largest display of Australian reptiles, Crocosaurus Cove is a must see attraction when visiting Darwin and the Top End.
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Mindil Beach Sunset Market
Amid the breezy dry season air on Thursday and Sunday evenings, Mindil Beach Sunset Market hosts street performers, musicians, craft stalls and a large collection of international food stalls on the stretch of parkland behind Mindil Beach. Arrive early (about 6pm) to beat the crowds. Immerse your tastebuds in Darwin's Asian food culture with a Malaysian laksa, a savoury Japanese pancake or a Thai green papaya salad. For dessert, visit Petra's Raw Cakes and munch on a raw brownie ball, or a slice of lime and macadamia cheesecake.
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Crocodylus Park
Crocodylus Park is the best place in Australia to come face to face with the largest reptiles on the planet! Built upon 30 years of experience in crocodile research and conservation, Crocodylus Park plays host to over a thousand crocodiles from 30 cm long hatchlings to massive adults measuring over 4.8 m and weighing more than half a ton!
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Darwin Military Museum
The Darwin Military Museum is located at East Point adjacent to the Defence of Darwin Experience. The site is within a heritage listed area that contains WWII fortifications. The No.2 gun turret is located within the Military Museum and, along with the No.1 gun turret, is one of the major fortifications at East Point. The Museum aims to collect artefacts from all conflicts where Australian troops were deployed
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National Military Vehicle Museum
Welcome to the National Military Vehicle Museum, which is operated on a volunteer basis by members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Society of South Australia. The Society is one of many Military Vehicle Clubs across Australia and throughout the world and its members are dedicated to the preservation of vehicles that are of military origin. The museum was developed as a way of providing undercover storage for the vehicles and at the same time allowing the public to view them. The majority of the vehicles are privately owned by the Society members and therefore each member is responsible for their own vehicles. In addition the vehicles are not just restored to look at, they are rebuilt to authentic running condition and most are road registered and driven regularly. You will see military vehicles and items ranging from the First World War to current times.
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Port Adelaide Historical Society Museum
The Port's local community museum is located a few minutes from the centre of Port Adelaide and contains historic collections of Port Adelaide, Semaphore, Lefevre Peninsula and environs, including the maritime collection of Keith Leleu, which was commenced in 1962 to address the loss of all things maritime. It houses a wide collection of artefacts, published materials, books, photographs and models; arranged to interest all who love ships and the sea.
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Migration Museum
Discover the history of South Australia through the stories of people and communities. The Migration Museum works towards the preservation, understanding and enjoyment of South Australia’s diverse cultures. It is a place to discover the many identities of the people of South Australia through the stories of individuals and communities.
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Adelaide Central Market
Savour South Australia’s rich bounty of produce – farm-fresh fruit and vegetables, artisan cheeses, smoked meats and seafood – at . For more than 140 years, the undercover market has been the epicentre for Adelaide’s food scene. Start with coffee at and freshly baked pastries at . Sample the local cheeses at and hard-to-find international cheese at . Drop by , which brings together more than 25 producers from , and stocks small-batch gin, flavoured oils, honey and sticky figs. To discover the best of the market, join Mark Gleeson’s early morning walking , during which you’ll enjoy generous tastings and meet the people behind the stalls.
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Hugo Michell Gallery
Hugo Michell Gallery is a privately-owned contemporary art space presenting the work of both established and emerging artists. Situated in Adelaide, South Australia, gallery director Hugo Michell is committed to presenting exciting and innovative work at the forefront of contemporary art across a range of mediums, including photography, painting, digital media, sculpture and installation.
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Glenelg Beach
Glenelg is Adelaide’s most popular beach. It is famous for its sandy wide beach, long grassed and shaded picnic areas right on the seaside, rich heritage, charming hotels and bustling shops, sidewalk cafes and plenty of entertainment at venues or on the strip with many talented buskers. Jetty Road is one kilometre of shopping that leads right into the jetty and the beach itself. You can take yourself off for some retail therapy with plenty of fashion and gift boutiques, shoe stores, swimwear and surf shops, art galleries and jewellery stores. Whether it is winter or summer, you can enjoy the myriad of activities available at Glenelg beach for all ages. The Glenelg foreshore has a natural playspace for kids to balance and swing. Moseley Square has water fountains to cool off on hot days.
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Old Government House
The summer residence of South Australia’s early governors, Old Government House, sits in the heart of Belair National Park. The house is an excellent example of Victorian architecture and is set amongst magnificent gardens. It was built on the Government farm as the former summer residence of several early Governors of South Australia. The cottage is an excellent example of Victorian-style architecture. It is looked after by a dedicated group of volunteers and the Friends of Old Government House in conjunction with DEWNR.
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Hahndorf
A stroll through historic Hahndorf's main street is the highlight for many visitors to the region. Settled in 1839 by Prussian Lutherans bravely seeking religious freedom on the other side of the world, Hahndorf's picturesque colonial charm remains remarkably intact. Located just 25 minutes from Adelaide, Hahndorf is Australia’s oldest surviving German settlement and still has a strong German flavour most evident in the smallgoods outlets, bakeries, pubs, restaurants and cafes that line the bustling main street. While its proximity to Adelaide makes Hahndorf a perennial favourite as a day trip destination, most visitors wish they had longer to explore all the township has to offer so consider accommodation from the wide range available.
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Town Beach
This pretty little beach is located a few minutes’ drive from the centre of the historic pearling town and overlooks the stunning turquoise coloured Roebuck Bay. Town Beach is a popular draw-card for holidaying families. Its spectacular calm aqua water makes for perfect photo opportunities. Bring your own picnic and spread out on the grass or on one of the picnic tables or enjoy dishes from the café near the water’s edge. A bonus for parents is the small water playground, ideal for the children to cool down. Town Beach is also a popular gathering point to see the natural attraction of the Staircase to the Moon on certain dates throughout the year. The moon rises above the exposed mudflats creating an optical illusion in the darkened sky of stairs reaching to the moon. The Town Beach Markets often complement this event and provide an opportunity for you to purchase craft items, dinner from the stalls and relax and enjoy the entertainment.
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Monarto Zoo
Monarto Zoological Park is an 1000 hectare open range zoological park and natural wilderness sanctuary, combined in a centre for conservation and enjoyment of wildlife and nature. Traveling through African and Asian wildlife habitat areas, where herds of exotic, grassland dwelling animals like giraffe, cheetah, zebra, antelope and ostrich can be seen at close proximity. Endangered species, including the Przewalski’s or Mongolian wild horse and the Scimitar oryx, are important features of the Park.
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Reddell Beach
Reddell Beach, a favourite beach amongst the Broome locals, with stark contrasts of red pindan bordering the white sandy beach. Examine the unusual rock formations with their intricate erosion patterns along the pristine stretch of beach. The calm refreshing waters are ideal for swimming. This lesser-known Broome beach is accessible along the unsealed Kavite Road which stretches from the Broome Port to Gantheaume Point Lighthouse. Car Park 3 is the usual access point and you need to walk down rugged sand cliffs to reach the stunning red rock formations standing like sculptures opposite the Indian Ocean.
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Cable Beach
With 22 kilometres of pristine white sand edged by the stunning turquoise water of the Indian Ocean, Broome’s Cable Beach attracts visitors from around Australia and the world. Bounded by sand dunes and ochre red cliffs, Cable Beach is as nature intended, with the convenience of resorts and caravan parks close by. With months on end of perfect warm weather there is no better place to enjoy a beach holiday. This white sandy beach offers many great beach activities. Uncrowded even in peak season between May and October, you can always find a quiet stretch of sparkling sand to lay down your towel or hire a deckchair and umbrella, and be lulled into relaxation as the waters gently lap the shoreline. Broome has huge tidal movements and visiting the beach at low tide will provide you with a large expanse of sandy beach to enjoy. If you are feeling active, try your hand at swimming, fishing, kayaking, surfing (when the swell is up), a beach stroll along the flat sands, or just relax and soak up some sunshine.
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Balgal Beach
Balgal Beach forms part of the popular Northern Beaches district of Townsville North Queensland. Offering a superb sand beach and secure swimming in the stinger net from November to May, Balgal is ideal for a relaxing day by the ocean or a fun way to spend time with the whole family. The area is also a renowned river fishing location. For those wishing to explore deeper and head out to the Great Barrier Reef, Balgal Beach provides excellent boat ramp facilities and easy access to the spectacular Palm Island group. There are a number of licensed cafés and accommodation available in the area including holiday units and designated tent camping and vehicle camping areas.
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Waitpinga Beach
Waitpinga, an Aboriginal name meaning home of the wind, is about 10 km southwest of Victor Harbor. It is well known for its fishing, mostly salmon and mullet, and also popular for its surfing. Waitpinga is an exposed beach that has the best consistent surfing this close to Adelaide. Recommended only for experienced swimmers and surfers with what may be considered dangerous conditions. There are rough waves, with powerful rips.
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Atherton Forest Mountain Bike Park
Atherton Forest Mountain Bike Park is a network of purpose-built, single-track mountain bike trails located in the Herberton Range State Forest. Trails meander through an open forest of gums, bloodwoods, mahoganys, she-oaks, grasstrees and cycads and some of the trails pass former forestry experimental plots of teak, blackbutt and tallowwood trees.
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The Crystal Caves
The Crystal Caves will rock your world! One hour from Cairns on the Atherton Tablelands, share one man’s passion for crystals and fossils at the Crystal Caves. Journey through 300m2 of tunnels and grottos that Rene built to feature his million year old natural crystals and prehistoric fossils. Take a self-guided tour and marvel at the interactive displays which allow you to touch and photograph the crystals, you can even crack your own!
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Crater Lakes National Park
This popular park features a deep crater lake surrounded by cool lush rainforest. Lake Barrine, part of Crater Lakes National Park, is a maar—a crater lake formed by two massive volcanic explosions. Take the short stroll to the giant bull kauri trees or stretch your legs on the longer 5km track around the lake. Look for rainforest animals, such as the colourful but cryptic Boyd's forest dragon, along the way. Paddle your canoe onto the smooth lake and look for fish, turtles, eels and waterbirds along the shallow, reedy edges.
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Anderson Park Botanic Gardens
Anderson Gardens is the largest of Townsville's botanic gardens, offering 25 hectares of fauna and flora to explore. Wander through the collection of garden displays or find a shady spot to sit back and relax. Centrally located in Mundingburra, the Garden contains fine specimens of tropical trees, palms and Pandanus. The World Cycad Garden, Grand Avenues and Tropical Orchard are of particular note. A representative collection of Cape York Peninsula rainforest specimens is displayed along with native plants and flora of the dry tropical regions of the world. Anderson Gardens were named in appreciation of the work of William Anderson, City of Townsville's first Curator of Parks from 1878 to 1934. Anderson Gardens is a quiescent beauty amongst Townsville's abundant natural attractions.
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Paronella Park
Today Paronella Park remains a unique eco-friendly experience where history and romance are seamlessly fused together. Paronella Park is a magical, unforgettable place nestled amongst heritage gardens and 13 acres of lush Australian rainforest situated on the banks of the crystal clear waters of Mena Creek, south of Innisfail. The ruins of the Spanish Castillo feature prominently on the grounds of Paronella Park, as do several other distinctive structures that were designed and built by the original owner of Paronella Park – Jose Paronella. Visitors can explore the architecturally unique ruins of the Castle and buildings of yesteryear, or wander through the lush gardens and Australian rainforest while being transported to another time and place altogether.
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Castle Hill
Just metres short of a mountain, Castle Hill is the giant pink granite monolith that stands proud in the centre of Townsville - a perfect place for visitors to orientate themselves. As well as offering vehicle access, Castle Hill provides a number of popular walking tracks, which are frequented by more than 2,500 locals a day! The 360-degree views of Townsville at the top are well worth the journey. Be sure to have a camera on hand, particularly for sunrise or sunset as these are photo opportunities which shouldn't be missed. Apart from being an iconic centrepiece for the city and a lookout for spectacular scenic views, Castle Hill has a significant history. The Hill's vantage was used by visiting American soldiers during World War II. According to local legend, the visitors famously offered to demolish the hill and use the rock to build a bridge to Magnetic Island. A World War II observation bunker sits on one corner of the Hill reminding visitors of Castle Hill's military history.
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Museum Of Tropical Queensland
The award-winning Museum of Tropical Queensland provides a snapshot of this diverse region of North Queensland, from World Heritage listed rainforest and reefs to the story of the shipwrecked HMS Pandora, the ship sent to capture the Bounty mutineers. The Museum's family-friendly exhibitions and displays explore life in the tropics from prehistoric times to modern day. Located in the heart of Townsville, the Museum has temporary and permanent exhibitions to captivate visitors and their school holiday programs offer something for kids of all ages.
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Eighty Mile Beach Marine Park
The marine park has significant cultural, natural, and socio-economic values to the Australian community. The marine park protects habitat for endangered sawfishes and boosts food supplies for the hundreds of thousands of migratory shorebirds that use the adjacent Eighty Mile Beach, one of the most important shorebird sites in Australia. Natural oyster beds in the area provide crucial seed stock for the pearling industry. The marine park is about halfway between Port Hedland and Broome, adjacent to Western Australia’s Eighty Mile Beach Marine Park. The marine park covers 10,785 square kilometres, with depths from less than 15 metres to 70 metres. Charter fishing and recreational fishing are allowed in the marine park, though most people tend to stay a little closer to shore.
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Josephine Falls
The Josephine waterfalls and swimming hole are ranked amongst some of the most beautiful waterfalls in Tropical North Queensland Australia, and as such have been used in many television commercials. Visitors can swim in the crystal clear waters, and relax on the sandy beach as the gentle breeze rustles leaves high in the overhead rainforest canopy. Josephine Falls is a great place to spend a full day, half-day or just a visit and quick swim with a day tour operator. The public facilities here allow you to set up a barbeque and picnic in the purpose-built facilities and relax in this beautiful rainforest environment with your family and friends for a day. If you are an adventurer and love bushwalking or you are a dedicated a hiker then you may like to choose from a 1.2 km walk to the top waterfalls, a 10 km Bartle Frere hike to Broken Nose (return) or a 15 klm (one way) walk Bartle Frere up to the Atherton Tablelands over the back of the mountain. Josephine Falls is loved by Cairns locals all year round and a definite destination for nature lovers and backpackers alike. When you mingle in the clubs and bars around Cairns city you will hear the backpackers talking about their day’s adventure on the granite rock slides, the deep crystal clear rock pools and the absolute beauty of the place.
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Innisfail Chinese Temple
The Chinese Temple was built in 1940 by the shire's Chinese population who were drawn to the agricultural industry and the gold rushes of the region. Far North Queensland is a very special part of Australia. It is lush and Tropical with green intrusive mountains complementing the adjoining blue-water Great Barrier Reef. Innisfail is situated in the heart of Far North Queensland, and it is to this area that peoples from across the globe migrated, to share in Nature's bounty. The Chinese were one such small group and contributed to the community with their industrious ways and a subtle spiritual and cultural centre, referred to as the "Joss House", but now more appropriately named as the "Innisfail Temple".
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Crystal Cascades
Crystal Cascades is one of the secrets of Tropical North Queensland that locals wish they could hide from visitors, accessible only by self drive. It is a secluded freshwater swimming hole, hidden in a tropical rainforest. A series of small waterfalls flow into large pools surrounded by large impressive granite boulders.