Architecture in Leeds

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Kirkstall Abbey
Explore one of the most complete examples of a medieval Cistercian abbey in Britain. Set in wonderful parkland along the banks of the River Aire, Kirkstall Abbey boast historic architecture amid a haven of wildlife and greenery. Kirkstall Abbey Visitor Centre tells you more about the lives of the 12th century monks and contains the touch table, a unique catalogue of images of the abbey from the 18th century to the present day. Kirkstall Abbey is directly across the road from Abbey House Museum, this is a great opportunity to make a day out for all the family.
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Lotherton Hall
Enjoy a fantastic day out at Lotherton Hall, a great day out for the family. This charming Edwardian country estate once home to the Gascoigne family offers you plenty of choice things to do and see. Visit the house to see what life was like in Edwardian times, go back in time by dressing up in our children’s area, or travel around the world with the new interactive ‘The Gascoignes Abroad’. Make sure to take a stroll around the fabulous bird garden and see owls, flamingos and much more! Plus walk around the stunning grounds and visit the historic stables and carriage displays. Also, there is a choice of two play areas including the woodland play area for older kids.
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Harewood House
Harewood’s history is still evolving – always changing, always striving to stay relevant to the present day. It must be alive, cared for by the people who inhabit it and enjoyed by the people who visit it. Harewood is a living history, one with many stories still to tell.
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Opera North
Opera North is England’s national opera company in the North and one of Europe’s leading arts organisations.
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Goddards House and Garden
On the edge of the racecourse, just a stone’s throw away from the centre of York, sits Goddards, the home of the Terry family (think chocolate orange.) Noel Goddard Terry was the owner of the famous chocolate-making company Terry’s of York. His family house was designed by architect Walter Brierly in the Arts and Crafts style, with four acres of gardens designed by George Dillistone. Relax in Terry family home, recreated with a warm atmosphere where you can sit down and pour yourself a sherry in the Drawing Room, or take a leisurely stroll around the garden rooms. At Christmas time the house is dressed as the Terry family might have once enjoyed it and you're invited to make yourself at home. There's a special pre-bookable lunch on the menu in the Dining Room for seasonal get together with friends and family. The house has selected rooms displayed to give glimpses into the family home and working chocolate factory. The garden includes yew-hedged garden rooms, bowling green, wilderness gardens and plants for every season and is an oasis for wildlife. New additions include an orchard and fragrant garden, following the original planting styles from archive plans. Families can enjoy the games and play as the Terry family once did.
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Clifford's Tower
Clifford's Tower stands as a proud symbol of the power of England's medieval kings. Originally built by William the Conqueror to subdue the rebels of the north, it was twice burned to the ground, before being rebuilt by Henry III in the 13th century. The tower takes its name from one grisly incident in its long history when Roger de Clifford was executed for treason against Edward II and hanged in chains from the tower walls. With sweeping panoramic views of York and the surrounding countryside, it isn't hard to see why Clifford's Tower played such a crucial role in the control of northern England.
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York Art Gallery
Spot the L.S. Lowry’s, Turner or Hockney and surround yourself with some of the best ceramic art in the world at one of the UK’s best regional galleries. Seascapes rose in popularity as a subject for artists around 1790 and can include anything from oceans and beaches to coastlines and nautical scenes. Over the centuries artists have been fascinated with telling the story of our relationship with the sea and, as an island nation, with a rich maritime history, this is especially important to our past stories. The gallery is also currently hosting some other amazing exhibitions The National Gallery Masterpiece Tour, Sounds Like Her, Michael Lyons: Ancient and Modern & Lucy Rie: Ceramics and Buttons. See The Triumph of Pan by Nicholas Poussin as part of the National Gallery’s Masterpiece Tour 2019. Alongside this striking canvas, we will be showcasing a wide range of works from York Art Gallery’s collections which explore the themes in Poussin’s work.
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York Minster
Since the 7th century, the Minster has been at the centre of Christianity in the north of England and today remains a thriving church rooted in the daily offering of worship and prayer. The Minster was built for the glory of God. Every aspect of this ancient building - from the exquisite, handcrafted stone through to the unrivalled collection of medieval stained glass - tells the story of Jesus Christ. We invite you to discover this sacred place and the love of God at its heart, which has attracted people from across the globe for more than 1000 years. Take a fascinating 2000 year journey through interactive underground chambers in Revealing York Minster in the Undercroft. Follow in the footsteps of Roman soldiers and discover the stories of some of the people whose lives have been influenced by York Minster. The underground chambers have been totally transformed with dynamic new audio-visual and interactive galleries revealing the significance behind the cathedral's most treasured artefacts as never before.
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Treasurer's House
Nestled behind York Minster, all is not as it first appears. At one time divided into three houses, in the late 1800s wealthy Yorkshireman Frank Green created his version of a historic house to showcase his important collection. Find out about both sides of the story as he demolished parts of the house not to his liking, yet transformed a house of declining fortunes into a handsome property, with lavish interiors grand enough to entertain the future King, Edward VII. Treasurer's House is the first house to be donated to the National Trust complete with its contents. The remarkable collection includes antique furniture, ceramics, textiles and paintings from a 300-year period, collected by Frank Green as he travelled the world. At Christmas time see every room decorated with floral and fruit garlands, twinkling glittery remnants of a 1920s party alongside gifts and garlands. The award winning Christmas pudding scone is a popular addition to the festive menu. Little ones can book to don a hard hat and head out over the roof to see the man in red in his attic grotto.
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National Football Museum
Whether you’re a die-hard football fan, planning a visit with your family or on a weekend break to the great city of Manchester, enjoy a visit to the world's biggest and best football museum. Delve into the social history and culture of the much-loved sport, with fascinating objects and exhibitions showing how football became the game of our lives. Test your skills at everything from penalty kicks and clever tricks to shot-stopping and commentating, and get your hands on some of our top silverware! The museum has a range of tours and trails available every day, with a host of family-friendly activities running across weekends and throughout the school holidays.
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Manchester Art Gallery
One of the country's finest art collections in spectacular Victorian and contemporary surroundings. The gallery's £35 million transformations has enabled the collection to be presented to visitors in imaginative new ways. Highlights include outstanding pre-Raphaelite paintings, craft and design and early 20thC British art. Exciting exhibitions programme, there is a wide range of events, from talks and tours to hands-on activities for both children and adults. Superb visitor facilities include 2 cafes, large shop and full disabled access. For those with younger children, try one of our explorer tool belts for family groups with children aged three to six. There are plenty of tools to help you explore the gallery including binoculars, magnifying glasses, spot cards and much more.
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The John Rylands Library
For those who set eyes on Deansgate's The John Rylands Library for the first time, 'library' might not be the first word that comes to mind. This masterpiece of Victorian Gothic architecture looks more like a castle or cathedral.
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People's History Museum
People’s History Museum (PHM) is the national museum of democracy, telling the story of its development in Britain: past, present, and future. The museum provides opportunities for all people to learn about, be inspired by and get involved in ideas worth fighting for; ideas such as equality, social justice, co-operation, and a fair world for all. 2020 will mark the tenth birthday of PHM being in its home on the bank of the River Irwell in city-centre Manchester; a site that combines a restored historic building and magnificent contemporary extension. It is from this location, with two permanent galleries, a state of the art conservation studio, a changing exhibition gallery, archive and study centre and extensive learning and community spaces, that the national museum of democracy invites people to discover over 200 years of ideas worth fighting for.
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Ordsall Hall
Ordsall Hall is Salford's 'hidden gem'! Dating back over 600 years, it is one of the region's finest examples of an Elizabethan black and white half-timbered manor-house. Wander back through time soaking up the atmosphere of our fully-furnished Great Hall and Star Chamber Bedroom. Get the low-down on Tudor lifestyles; maybe reminisce in our Victorian showcase and kitchen; or unearth the wealth of new discoveries to be made in our exciting and informative family events and exhibitions programme. It's all happening at Ordsall Hall!
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IWM North
IWM North is part of Imperial War Museums – the world’s leading museum of war. Its unique purpose-built exhibition space gives powerful voice to the extraordinary experiences of ordinary people forced to live their lives in a world torn apart by conflict. Walkthrough a timeline of history from the First World War to the present day. Explore a vast collection of over 2,000 objects, each one with the power to move, surprise and inspire – from the First World War field gun that fired the opening British round on the Western Front, to the twisted rust-ridden steelwork retrieved from the rubble of the World Trade Center in New York. And immerse yourself in the award-winning 360-degree cinematic Big Picture Shows that bring a broad range of perspectives into poignant focus, reflecting not only on the immediate effects of war but also on what happens when the guns stop firing. This is a place where every object on display, every contemporary work of art and every special exhibition is designed to live long in the memory. This is IWM North.
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Dunham Massey Hall
A house filled with treasures and stories, an ancient deer park and a garden for all seasons. Dunham's Lost Years: a Victorian Tale of Love and Abandonment. See the House transformed to revisit its Victorian past. Meet the 7th Earl and his new wife, skilled circus performer Catharine Cox. See their story of love, status and scandal played out throughout the House and discover how they altered the course of Dunham's history forever. The plantsman's garden, one of the finest in the North West, is a tranquil oasis with something to delight in all seasons. The herd of fallow deer wander amongst the tree-lined avenues in the ancient Deer Park. The Park is also home to the fully restored 400-year-old working sawmill powered by overshot water.
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Blackpool Grand Theatre
When you enter the Victorian auditorium of the Blackpool Grand Theatre you will understand what people mean by ‘the glorious Grand’. There’s the incredibly ornate, gilded plasterwork, baroque ceiling, cavorting cherubs, cantilevered balconies allowing every seat a clear view of the stage and elegant new seats all creating a real ‘wow’ factor. Blackpool Grand Theatre is one of the few remaining theatres of great architectural character, designed by Frank Matcham. It has a magnificent 4-level auditorium with 1,100 seats. An all-year-round programme covering all live art forms. At Blackpool Grand Theatre, Lancashire's premier touring theatre and arts centre you will catch a wide-ranging programme of shows throughout the year.
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Blackpool Tower
The Blackpool Tower is a true British institution. It is the iconic feature of Blackpool’s famous seafront and continues to bring as much joy to visitors as it did when it was first constructed in 1894. Few attractions prove that #BlackpoolHasItAll quite like The Blackpool Tower, with stunning attractions for all the family to enjoy. Best of all, with amazing deals like our Blackpool Resort Pass and special midweek offers for mothers and toddlers, enjoying the perfect day out has never been more affordable. For a truly spectacular view of Blackpool, you need to head to the top of the tower. At 518ft tall, you’ll be pleased to know that there are lifts to the summit, where superb panoramic views await. Here, you can gaze out at the beautiful Irish Sea and get a unique bird’s-eye view of Blackpool itself, while on clear days you can see as far as North Wales, the Lake District and the Isle of Man. The brave amongst you can also try out the glass floor, where you can peek straight down to the streets below.
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Nottingham Cathedral
Nottingham Cathedral (the Cathedral Church of St Barnabas) was designed and built under renowned architect A.W.N. Pugin and the foundation stone was laid by Bishop Nicholas Wiseman in 1842, who had brought with him the relics of Saint Barnbas from Rome. At the time of its opening in 1844, the Cathedral was the largest Catholic church to have been built in England since the Reformation. The Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Catholic Diocese of Nottingham which covers the counties of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire and Rutland. The Cathedral has been home to choral music since its consecration and today boasts a flourishing Music Department with the Cathedral Choir and Cathedral Youth Choir.
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Nottingham Council House
It takes a building of some distinction to stand out in a city as rich in beautiful and interesting architecture as Nottingham, and the Council House does not disappoint... Far from being a museum, The Council House is a vital, living part of the city and the centre of local politics as elected councillors who represent the people of the City of Nottingham conduct much of their business here. This magnificent Neo-Baroque building, whose 200ft high dome dominates the city skyline, has been the heart of the city centre for 80 years and a source of pride for the people of Nottingham. On a still day, the chimes from the Council House clock, known as Little John, can be heard for miles around. It has been the setting for many splendid public occasions. Royalty, statesmen and women and people from the world of showbusiness have been received and entertained here. The FA and European cups have been held aloft from its balcony, and a great many worthy organisations and individuals have received the thanks of a grateful city within its walls.
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William Booth Birthplace Museum
Discover the life and work of William Booth – Nottingham’s most famous preacher and social reformer and founder of The Salvation Army – at The William Booth Birthplace Museum. Travel back in time to William’s home as it would have appeared in 1829 and explore how William turned his vision into reality.
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Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King
No trip to Liverpool is complete without a visit to the awe-inspiring Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. This dramatic icon of faith, architecture and human endeavour is spectacular in both scale and design. Explore the Cathedral's majestic interior which includes modern works of art and stunning design features, such as its striking Lantern Tower - the world’s largest area of coloured glass. Along with daily Masses and Services, the Cathedral runs a diverse programme of wonderful music concerts, exhibitions and special events.
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Liverpool Cathedral
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral is Britain's biggest Cathedral and the 5th largest in Europe. The cathedral is free to enter, however the tower and audio tour is highly recommended.
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Royal Albert Dock
With the iconic Royal Albert Dock Liverpool being one of the prime locations to visit during a visit to Liverpool, visitors can take advantage of the impressive retail and leisure offering at the Dock, world class museums and attractions and some of the city’s finest independents. Visitors to Tate Liverpool will find British and international modern and contemporary art, activities for families as well as a Tate café and shop. Uncover objects from the Titanic, find out about life at sea and learn about the port of Liverpool at Merseyside Maritime Museum. The International Slavery Museum tells the untold stories of enslaved people and learn about historical and contemporary slavery. At the award-winning The Beatles Story, the world's largest permanent exhibition purely devoted to the lives and times of The Beatles, visitors can find everything they need to know about four lads from Liverpool who shook the world.
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Belgrave Hall & Gardens
Belgrave Hall is a historic house, providing an oasis of peace and quiet in a busy city. The hall was built in the early 18th century in what was then a small village three miles from the town of Leicester. Now city traffic passes, almost unnoticed, just beyond the garden walls. Edmund Cradock, a hosiery merchant, built Belgrave Hall but died soon after its completion. The Hall has had several owners over the years, including John Ellis – a wealthy businessman who was responsible for bringing the railways to Leicester. Visitors can explore Belgrave Hall and the beautiful surrounding gardens on special event days. From April to September the gardens are open every Wednesday and the first full weekend of the month, with additional special events open to the public. Visit the website for more details on specific open days.
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Abbey Park
Hugging the banks of the River Soar in the north of the city is Abbey Park – a beautiful green space to relax and admire Leicester’s riverside scenery. The park has a choice of activities to keep the whole family entertained. The boating lake in the centre of the park offers hire of both rowing and pedalo boats – fun for adults and children alike! On a summer’s day, relax and pedal your way around the beautiful lake in the centre of the park, enjoying the sweeping views of serene parkland all around. Heritage lovers will enjoy a stroll around the remains of the twelfth century Leicester Abbey and the ruins of Cavendish House, a 17th century mansion. The Abbey was founded by the second Earl of Leicester, Robert le Bossu. It became one of the wealthiest Augustinian abbeys in the country, but closed in 1538 when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Whilst converting the overgrown abbey grounds into a public excavations revealed the remains of the abbey church and the other main building ranges, which can be seen in the park today. Those looking to get active can take advantage of the parks many sporting facilities, including a bowling green, five hard surface tennis courts, orienteering courses, a lavender maze and Ping! table tennis tables – perfect for those looking to try something new or get in some extra practise. Pets Corner is a favourite with all visitors to the park – an area to interact with a variety of small, domesticated animals. The area includes an aviary with a collection of exotic birds, as well as small enclosures housing hens, guinea pigs, rabbits, goats and pygmy goats.
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The Guildhall
The Guildhall is a historic building and the oldest building still in use in the city. It was Leicester’s first police station and between 1876 and the 1900’s and saw many unsavoury characters pass through its doors. The Great Hall itself was built in about 1390 as a meeting place for the Guild of Corpus Christi (a small but powerful group of businessmen and gentry) and it’s also believed that Shakespeare performed here during Tudor times. Over the years it has had many uses, including housing one of the oldest public libraries and serving as the Town Hall. After restoration, the Guildhall was opened to the public as a museum in 1926. Today the Guildhall is best known as an excellent performance venue, attracting acts from across the country, and as a museum where visitors can step back in time and come face to face with Crankie Gemmie and Emma Smith, two of Leicester's notorious pickpockets who can be found lurking in the Victorian police cells. The museum is also home to the Medieval Leicester galleries. Through objects and activities, visitors can walk the streets of medieval Leicester and uncover a world both familiar and very different to our own!
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Leicester Cathedral
Leicester Cathedral lies at the heart of Leicester's Old Town. The cathedral is open for visitors and all are welcome within its doors. From the fine stained glass to the story and tomb of King Richard III, explore over 900 years of history in this peaceful and beautiful building. The tranquil Cathedral Gardens surround the cathedral. A quiet space in the heart of the city, the gardens are made up of areas of lawn, flower beds, seating areas and a water feature. The gardens are also home to two pieces of public art: the iconic bronze statue of King Richard III, commissioned by the Richard III Society in 1980, and the sculpture 'Towards Stillness' – an installation representing a timeline of the King's life, especially commissioned for the occasion of his reinterment.
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Curve
Curve is a spectacular, state-of-the-art theatre in the heart of Leicester’s vibrant Cultural Quarter. Opened in 2008 by Her Majesty The Queen, the award-winning building designed by acclaimed architect Rafael Viñoly offers a completely unique visitor experience. Unlike any other theatre in the UK, there is no traditional backstage area. Audiences can enjoy the full theatre-making process, peek behind the scenes and maybe even spot an actor or two dashing from the stage to their dressing room or enjoying a coffee in the café. The building’s stunning curved façade is made from 1,192 tonnes of steel and 46,000 square metres of glass. Managed by Leicester Theatre Trust, Curve is a registered charity providing engaging theatrical experiences for the community. Working with people of all ages and backgrounds, the theatre is committed to nurturing new and emerging talent, as well as creating world-class productions.
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Shrewsbury Castle
The castle stands at the top of a hill and was built as a defensive fortification for Shrewsbury, which was otherwise protected by the River Severn. Founded by Roger de Montgomery in 1074, the castle has undergone many transformations, the last one being by Thomas Telford who 'modernised' the building in the 18th century. Climb the walls of the castle for amazing views and some people watching from high above the town. The grounds are free to visit and perfect for picnics too. The Castle houses the spectacular collections of the Shropshire Regimental Museum Trust including pictures, uniforms, medals, weapons and other equipment from the 18th Century to the present day. One of the prize exhibits is the baton of the German Admiral Doenitz, captured by soldiers of the King's Shropshire Light Infantry at the very end of World War II. Doenitz had been nominated as Hitler's successor. There are also stories about the British burning down the White House in 1814. The displays include a brief history of the castle through the centuries.
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St Alkmund's Church
St Alkmund’s is the only remaining open Anglican Church in the historic heart of Shrewsbury. St. Alkmund’s Church was founded in the 10th century, possibly by Aethefleda, daughter of King Alfred. She claimed descent from Alkmund, a Northumbrian prince murdered circ AD 800 near Derby.
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Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery
Re-opened at the old Music Hall in April 2014, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery tells the stories that make Shropshire unique through its’ amazing galleries: Roman Gallery, Shropshire Gallery, Medieval, Tudor and Stuart Galleries and the Special Exhibition Gallery. Come and explore millions of years of history through over one thousand remarkable objects in the extraordinary set of building that house Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery. From key Shropshire finds like the Roman tombstones and headstones and the Shropshire Mammoth to a fine geology and Tudor collection, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery intimately depicts local history using all senses. Since opening, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery has established itself as the perfect family museum and holds events and activities throughout the week that are ideal for children. Children and their families can take part in great activities like Mini-Mammoths to following the trail of Maximo Mouse through the museum – there’s always something in this family Museum for children to have fun and learn.
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St Chad's Church
St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury occupies a prominent position in the county town of Shropshire. The current church building was built in 1792, and with its distinctive round shape and high tower, it is a well-known landmark in the town. It faces The Quarry area of parkland, which slopes down to the River Severn. The church is a Grade I listed building. The motto of the church is "open doors, open hearts, and open minds". This indicates the aspiration of the church to be a welcoming church, involved in the community, and on a collective journey seeking after God.
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Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens
These 10 acre walled gardens (listed Grade II) are a rare example of formal English garden design. They are being restored as near as possible to the period 1680 to 1762 when the Bridgeman family moved to Weston Park. The house was built in 1599 by Sir Edward Devereux and extended by Sir John Bridgeman I about 100 years later. The Gardens were developed by several generations of the Bridgeman Family (later to become the Earls of Bradford) reaching peaks of excellence around 1760 and 1900. The Gardens fell into decline during the middle part of the twentieth century until they were rescued by the Trust in 1985. The Holly Maze is a distorted mirror image of the one at Hampton Court Palace designed by George London and Henry Wise.
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Aston Hall
At Aston Hall follow in the footsteps of royalty and visit one of the last great Jacobean houses to be built. Built between 1618 and 1635 for Sir Thomas Holte and home to James Watt Junior from 1817-1848, Aston Hall is steeped in history. Now a grade I listed building, the hall is restored to its former Jacobean splendor and is hugely popular with visitors of all ages. Walk through the stunning interiors and see the home that received royalty, was besieged during the English Civil War and inspired an author.
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Black Country Living Museum
Award-winning corner of the West Midlands is now one of the finest and largest open-air museums in the United Kingdom. After very humble beginnings, a bright idea and 40 years of inspiration, this is twenty six acres worth exploring. Amazing as it may seem, we have created a ‘place’ – a real and lively place, where once there was nothing and nobody. With a village and charismatic residents to chat with. Hear the stories of the people who lived and worked in the Black Country from our friendly Historic Characters. They'll explain what it was really like to be alive at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Visit a fairground - fancy a bit of old-fashioned fun? Why not visit our fairground with original rides dating back to 1910? Have a go on the Brooklyn Cakewalk, test your skills on the 'hook a duck' or hit the right spot with a throw on the the coconut shy. Have a ride on a vintage bus. Museum maintains a selection of vintage vehicles for you to ride throughout the year. Why not hop on the longest trolleybus route in the country? Play some old school street games. Head on down to the cobbled street and try your hand at some classic street games including the 'hoop and stick' and the 'cup and ball' . And also Explore over 40 period shops, houses and industrial areas. Since 1978 we've been recreating buildings from around the Black Country, sometimes moving them here brick-by-brick. Grab and a map and get exploring!