Historical Sites in Makassar

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Indonesia
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Fort Rotterdam
Standing majestically at the western coast of Makassar, South Sulawesi. Fort Rotterdam is recognized as the city’s most iconic landmark. With historical traces dating back to the Kingdom of Gowa from the 16th century to colonization by the Dutch, this Fort has silently witnessed many episodes in Makassar’s history, playing a most essential role in its development. Its magnificence and authenticity has always captivated those who set eyes on it. Originally called Benteng or Fort Jumpandang or Ujung Pandang, the huge complex was first built in 1545 in the era of Imanrigau Daeng Bonto Karaeng Lakiung or Karaeng Tunipalangga Ulaweng, the tenth King of Gowa. Initially, the fort was made from a mixture of Stone and burnt clay, and took the shape of a typical square Portuguese architectural style. The fort was also expanded and took on a new shape resembling a sea turtle, thus the fort gained a new name, Benteng Pannyua (Penyu) or Fort Sea turtle. The shape is not only unique, but also contains deep meaning. For just as a sea turtle lives both on land and at sea, the glory of the Gowa Kingdom also stretched on land as well as over the seas.
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Tana Toraja
Tana Toraja is safely protected beyond the lofty mountains and rugged granite cliffs of the central highlands of the island of Sulawesi and the home of the Toraja people. 'Discovered' and opened to the world from their long isolation only since the beginning of the last century, the Toraja today still adhere to their age-old beliefs, rituals and traditions. The nobility of Toraja are believed to be descendants of heavenly beings who came down by a heavenly stairway to live here on earth in this beautiful landscape. To keep up the energy of the land and its people, the Toraja people believe that these must be sustained through rituals that celebrate both life and death, which are attached to the agricultural seasons. Tourists to Toraja, therefore, are either attracted by its unique culture and rituals, most of which are mostly centered around graves and death ceremonies. While others prefer to avoid the morbid images and go trekking through the spectacular, almost untouched Toraja countryside visiting remote villages, or exhilarate in rafting the Sa'dan river rapids.
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Bajra Sandhi Monument
Set within a beautiful park in front of the Bali Governor Office in Renon, Denpasar, this massive cultural monument was built in order to mark the struggle of the Balinese people throughout history. The Bajra Sandhi Monument features a three-tiered black stone structure with a tall tower that’s surrounded by courtyards. There’s a spiral staircase that leads up to the top of the monument offering 360-degree views of Denpasar, including the surrounding government buildings and the towers of the Denpasar Cathedral. On the building’s second floor, a series of 33 dioramas trace Bali’s long and unique history: prehistoric times, the introduction of Hinduism, Dutch colonialism, and its independence.
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Ratu Boko Temple
Settled on a hillside plateau, overlooking Prambanan temple complex and with a view to Mount Merapi behind Prambanan Temple complex, lie the remains of a once grand palace. The palace (kraton) is named Ratu Boko after a King Boko of local folklore, but the real owner of the palace is more likely to have been a king of a local dynasty.
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Borobudur Temple
The Sailendra dynasty built this Largest Buddhist monument in the world between AD 780 and 840. It was built as a place for glorifying Buddha and a pilgrimage spot to guide mankind from worldly desires into enlightenment and wisdom according to Buddha.
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Chu Chi Tunnels
The Chu Chi Tunnels are part of a massive war museum in Ho Chi Minh. They offer visitors a sneak-peek at the underground life of Vietnamese soldiers back in 1948. The site has over 120km of underground tunnels, with trapdoors, living areas, kitchens, storage facilities, armoury, hospitals, and command centres. After the war against the French, Vietnamese soldiers expanded the tunnels and included effective air filtration systems, which helped them survive the Chu Chi carpet-bombings. It is now one of Ho Chi Minh’s most iconic attractions. You can enjoy plenty of activities during your visit. A popular option is following the narrow routes of the underground tunnel. Before entering the underground tunnels, visitors watch a short film of Chu Chi Tunnels so that they understand how the tunnel system works. Parts of Chu Chi Tunnels are also cemented and widened so that the crawl is less harrowing than it would have been in the past.
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Silver Pagoda
Wat Preah Keo Morakot (Silver Pagoda) is located in the southern portion of the Royal Palace complex. The pagoda was formerly known as Wat Uborsoth Rotannaram because it is where the King worshiped, prayed and practiced every Buddhist Silas Day. In the additional, the royal family and officials also held Buddhist ceremonies there.This pagoda has no monks. However, this Majestic King Norodom Sihanouk lived there for one year when he entered the monkhood on July 31, 1947. Because the pagoda has no monks, visitors usually refer to it as Preah Vihear Preah Keo Morakot. When the King celebrates Buddhist ceremonies, monks from other pagoda such as Wat Unaloam and Wat Botumvattey are invited to attend the ceremonies. Preah Vihear Preah Keo Morakot was built between 1892 and 1902, during the reign of King Norodom, but at that time it was constructed of wood and brick. Its design is base on Cambodian architectural style. Then Banhchos Khan Seima ceremony was held on Feb 5, 1903. There are 1,650 art objects housed in this temple. Most of them are Buddha figures. They are made of gold, silver, bronze and other valuable materials. Some are decorated with diamonds. They are gifts from the King, the royal family, dignitaries and other people who worship at Preah Vihear Preah Keo Morakot, where they pray for peace and prosperity, for happiness and for the preservation of Cambodian cultural heritage for the next generation. In front of the throne, site a Buddha statue made of gold, weighing 90 kilograms (about 200 pounds) and decorated with 2,086 diamonds. The biggest diamond is on the crown. It is 25 millimeters. This statue was commissioned in 1904 by King Sisowath, following the suggestion of King Norodom. King Norodom said, after his body was cremated the gold casket should be melted to make Buddha statue representing Preah Srei Araymetrey. This Buddha statue is named Preah Chin Raingsei Rachik Norodom.
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Alice Springs Telegraph Station
The Alice Springs Telegraph Station is a historic museum precinct, presenting the story of the connection of Australia to the rest of the world through Telegraph Communication in 1871. Since being declared protected as a Historical Reserve in 1963, it has become the best preserved Station along the Overland Telegraph Line. Guided tours of the heritage precinct run from March to November at 9:30am, 11:30am, 1:30pm & 3:30pm. Visit the original "Alice Spring" and learn about the origins of the town. Enjoy NT roasted coffee and homemade snacks at the Trail Station Wi-Fi Cafe and browse through the gift and souvenir shop and send a postcard from the towns original red Postbox.
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Anzac Hill
The most visited landmark in Alice Springs, Anzac Hill is the ideal spot for an overview of the town. The lookout offers a panoramic view of Alice Springs and the beautiful surrounding ranges. The Anzac Hill Memorial was unveiled on 25 April 1934 (Anzac Day) and was originally dedicated to all those members of the armed services who had paid the supreme sacrifice during World War I. It has now become a memorial to all those who have served in the defence of their country during all wars in which Australia has participated. Facing the Gap, interesting and comprehensive interpretative signs border the lookout. These detail some of the local Arrentte people's creation stories, featuring the Yeperenye Caterpillar of the MacDonnell Ranges and Mparntwe (Alice Springs).
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Angkor Wat
There are few places anywhere on earth to match the splendour of Angkor Wat. The temple is one of the largest monuments to religion ever built and is truly one the wonders of the world. Believed to have been constructed as a temple and mausoleum for King Suryavarman II at the peak of the Khmer empire in the first half of the 12th century, Angkor Wat is probably the best-preserved of the Angkorean temples. As with other Angkorean temples and walled cities such as Angkor Thom, the central theme of Khmer architecture revolved around the idea of the temple-mountain.
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Angkor Thom
Angkor Thom is undeniably an expression of the highest genius. It is, in three dimensions and on a scale worthy of an entire nation, the materialization of Buddhist cosmology, representing ideas that only great painters would dare to portray. Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer Empire, was a fortified cit enclosing residences of priest, officials of the palace and military, as well as buildings for administering the kingdom. These structures were built of wood and have perished but the remaining stone monuments testify that Angkor Thom was indeed a "Great City" as its name implies. Temples inside the walls of the city described are Bayon, Phimeanakas, Baphuon, Terrace of the Elephants, Terrace of the Leper King, Prah Palilay, Tep Pranam and Prasat Suor Prat. Symbolically, Angkor Thom is a microcosm of the universe, divided into four parts by the main axes. The temple of the Bayon is situated at the exact center of the axes and stands as the symbolical link between heaven and earth. The wall enclosing the city of Angkor Thom represents the stonewall around the universe and the mountain ranges around Meru. The surrounding moat (now dry) symbolizes the cosmic ocean.
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Ta Prohm Temple
Shrouded in dense jungle the temple of Ta Prohm is ethereal in aspect and conjures up a romantic aura. Fig, banyan and kapok trees spread their gigantic roots over stones, probing walls and terraces apart, as their branches and leaves intertwine to form a roof over the structures. Trunks of trees twist amongst stone pillars. The strange, haunted charm of the place entwines itself about you as you go, as inescapably as the roots have wound themselves about the walls and towers', wrote a visitor 40 years ago. Ta Prohm is among the largest of the monuments in the Angkor complex, the inscription gives an idea of the size of the temple. The complex included 260 statues of gods, 39 towers with pinnacles and 566 groups of residences. Ta Prohm comprises a series of long low buildings standing on one level, which are enclosed by rectangular laterite wall (600 by 1,000 meters, 1,959 by 3,281 feet). Only traces of the wall are still visible. The center of the monument is reached by a series of towers connected with passages. This arrangement forms a ' sort of sacred way into the heart of the monument’; three-square galleries enclose the area.
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Phnom Bakheng Hill
It is a testimony to the love of symmetry and balance which evolved its style....in pure simplicity of rectangles its beauty is achieved. It is a pyramid mounting in terraces, five of them ...Below Bak-Keng lays all the world of mystery, the world of the Khmer, more mysterious ever under its cover of impenetrable verdure. Phnom Bakheng is located 1,30 meters (4,265 feet) north of Angkor Wat and 400 meters (1,312 feet) south of Angkor Thom. Enter and leave Phnom Bakheng by climbing a long steep path with some steps on the east side of the monument (height 67 meters, 220 feet) In the 1960 this summit was approached by elephant and, according to a French visitor, the ascent was "a promenade classic and very agreeable. Arrive at the summit just before sunset for a panoramic view of Angkor and its environs. The golden hues of the setting sun on this vista are a memorable sight.
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Banteay Srei
The tenth century temple of Banteay Srei is renowned for its intricate decoration carved in pinkish sandstone that covers the walls like tapestry. Banteay Srei is an exquisite miniature; a fairy palace in the heart of an immense and mysterious forest; the very thing that Grimm delighted to imagine, and that every child's heart has yearned after, but which mature years has sadly proved too lovely to be true. And here it is, in the Cambodian forest at Banteay Srei, carved not out of the stuff that dreams are made of, but of solid sandstone.
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Vinh Moc Tunnels
In Vinh Moc - you'll find a very impressive temple complex. They are the remains of a North Vietnamese fishing village, where the people have built a tunnel complex to protect themselves against the American bombing. Literally, the village went underground. It offered protection to more than 90 families. The tunnel complex has three levels. The majority of the tunnels is open to visitors and is kept in their original state (with the exception of the recent addition of electric lighting). The tunnels were used not only for civilian purposes (the distinction between civilians and Vietcong is a dim area), but were also used to transport weapons and other equipment. These were brought to Con Co Island, a base off the North Vietnamese coast near Vinh Moc in the South China Sea. The tour usually starts at the museum, which is above the ground. There are objects and photographs on displays. There is also a watch, which is a gift from the GDR. Then begins the real visit to the tunnels. The tunnels are situated at a depth of 11 to 20 meters. You'll pass the "family quarters" - really just niches on the side of the main tunnel, with barely enough room for three people and zero privacy. They also show you larger dwellings, which were used for meetings, storage, and as a hospital. Nowadays, there are life-sized puppets, to make it clear for the tourists. Suddenly you stand again in daylight, right by the sea, just above a beach. This output is well camouflaged. This output was at night to receive weapons and other supplies, which were sent via Con Co Island. Then you go back in and finally you'll get out at one of the ground-level exits. During the approximately four years they lived under the ground, there were 17 babies born in the "tunnel hospital." In principle, these babies would only see the light when the war was over.
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Tam Toa Church
Tam Toa Church is a Catholic church located on Nguyen Du Street, Dong My Ward, Dong Hoi City, Quang Binh Province. The church was built in 1886. Han Mac Tu was baptized here in 1912 with the Christian name Nguyen Trong Tri Franois. In the eight years from 1964 to 1972, the US air bombardment of North Vietnam. Dong Hoi was flattened, Tam Toa church was bombed only the bell tower remained. After the Geneva Agreement in 1954, the whole Tam Tran migrated to the South. Since then the church has been abandoned. During the Vietnam War, Tam Toa Church was bombed 48 times by the United States Air Force. On February 11, 1965, the church was hit by a bomb, leaving only the bell tower with bullet holes. Dong Hoi town was razed by US bombs and the church bell tower became a war relic. On February 26, 1997, the People's Committee of Quang Binh province issued Decision No. 143 / QD-UB, The court has become a war crimes vestige and is historical-cultural vestiges of the province, which need to be strictly protected. October 23, 2008, Quang Binh People's Committee and the Bishop of Doai was united and signed a memorandum saying: "The old Tam Toa Church is now evidence of war crimes. The two sides will maintain and embellish in order to protect and serve the traditional research and education for the young generation... In the Quang Binh tour short or long, visitors more or less have the opportunity to visit many historical relics, evidence of war in this land. Tam Toa Church is the largest Catholic church in Quang Binh, also the largest and only church of Dong Hoi city, located in the heart of the city.
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Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural Park
Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural Park prides itself on its authenticity. The Tjapukai people inhabited the tropic region that extends from Cairns to Port Douglas and inland to Kuranda. Their name means ‘People of the Rainforest'. The displays and cultural dances within the park portray the Dreamtime through to the present reality of today's Tjapukai people.
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Innisfail Chinese Temple
The Chinese Temple was built in 1940 by the shire's Chinese population who were drawn to the agricultural industry and the gold rushes of the region. Far North Queensland is a very special part of Australia. It is lush and Tropical with green intrusive mountains complementing the adjoining blue-water Great Barrier Reef. Innisfail is situated in the heart of Far North Queensland, and it is to this area that peoples from across the globe migrated, to share in Nature's bounty. The Chinese were one such small group and contributed to the community with their industrious ways and a subtle spiritual and cultural centre, referred to as the "Joss House", but now more appropriately named as the "Innisfail Temple".
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Shamian Island
Shamian Island is Guangzhou's scenic foreign settlement, and ranks as one of the best tourist attractions in Guangzhou and is a treat for fans of architecture and history alike. Tree-lined quiet pedestrian-only roads make for a wonderful place to visit for a stroll, and the area is a quiet reminder of Guangzhou's colonial European period. Sightseers will notice that structures in one area of the island have more of an English style and that one area has more of French style, which is a result of Guangzhou's tumultuous history on this island. While walking around Shamian Island, there are lots of incredible buildings to be seen, and there is a lot of opportunity to try different cuisines including the local Cantonese cuisine. It's a great place for a stroll, and you'll find many old official embassy buildings, cathedrals, churches, as well as shade walking along the greenery. Lady of Lourdes Chapel, a big French cathedral, stands out as one of the most interesting buildings on the island. It was built in 1892. There is also the British Protestant Church, Christ Church Shameen, which was built in 1865 and makes for an interesting sight. Tourists appreciate the island as a quiet place to get away from the crowds and noise of the city, and you'll find various bronze statues around depicting life on the island in earlier times. Traffic is controlled to keep the island quiet, so it is partly pedestrian only.
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Yin Hsi East Gate
The East Gate sits on a granite base pierced by an arched walkway. On the upper half of the gate is a building originally constructed of wood and later rebuilt in concrete. The building is supported by 24 columns on which sit a double-eaved roof with a short upturned ridge that adds to the power of the design. In front of the gate is a stone stele recounting the history of the construction of the Hsinchu City wall. There is also a public square that joins both traditional and modern elements at the front of this major Hsinchu landmark.
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Chen Ancestral Shrine
This Chen Clan Academy was organized by two Chinese-Americans who wanted Chen clan students to have an academy in Guangzhou. It was built just before the end of the Qing era between 1890 and 1894. It became a museum in 1957, and the remaining artwork and traditional architecture and decorations were deemed to be so valuable that in 1988 it was named a National Key Cultural Heritage Protection Unit by the State Council of China. It now is a Chinese folk art museum. The building covers 13,200 square meters or 142,000 square feet. It has 19 buildings with nine halls and six courtyards that are connected in a symmetric pattern. On the main axis are the Main Entrance (头门), the Assembly Hall, and the Rear Hall (后堂). These three main buildings are separated by courtyards. It is one of Guangzhou's best tourist highlights.
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Castle Hill
Just metres short of a mountain, Castle Hill is the giant pink granite monolith that stands proud in the centre of Townsville - a perfect place for visitors to orientate themselves. As well as offering vehicle access, Castle Hill provides a number of popular walking tracks, which are frequented by more than 2,500 locals a day! The 360-degree views of Townsville at the top are well worth the journey. Be sure to have a camera on hand, particularly for sunrise or sunset as these are photo opportunities which shouldn't be missed. Apart from being an iconic centrepiece for the city and a lookout for spectacular scenic views, Castle Hill has a significant history. The Hill's vantage was used by visiting American soldiers during World War II. According to local legend, the visitors famously offered to demolish the hill and use the rock to build a bridge to Magnetic Island. A World War II observation bunker sits on one corner of the Hill reminding visitors of Castle Hill's military history.
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National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall
This memorial hall was built in memory of Chiang Kai-shek, the first president of the Republic of China. Work on the hall began in 1976, a year after President Chiang passed away. Design by C.C. Yang, who was also the architect for The Grand Hotel, the memorial hall is white with a blue roof, representing the dominant colors in the ROC flag; while the emblem of the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) adorns the vaulted ceiling. A bronze statue of Chiang looks west symbolically to the Presidential Office Building and mainland China. The front plaza of the hall is also a major venue for democratic assemblies.
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National Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall
Designed by local architect Wang Da-hung, this memorial hall was established in memory of Dr. Sun Yat-sen, the father of the Republic of China. The hall also serves an educational and research role, hosting various cultural and art events throughout the year, including the Golden Horse Awards, Golden Bell Awards, and Culture Awards. The hall is surrounded by a large park, further making it a popular weekend escape for city residents.
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Gubulla Munda
A popular place in the Burdekin for visitors to take photos is located in Plantation Park, Ayr. The giant carpet snake is an impressive feature, and makes a fantastic backdrop. This 60 metre artwork depicts Gubulla Munda, the Aboriginal totem and the protective spirit for the Birri Gubba people. Gubulla Munda holds sacred cultural and spiritual significance to the Traditional Owners.
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Old Government House
The summer residence of South Australia’s early governors, Old Government House, sits in the heart of Belair National Park. The house is an excellent example of Victorian architecture and is set amongst magnificent gardens. It was built on the Government farm as the former summer residence of several early Governors of South Australia. The cottage is an excellent example of Victorian-style architecture. It is looked after by a dedicated group of volunteers and the Friends of Old Government House in conjunction with DEWNR.
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Hahndorf
A stroll through historic Hahndorf's main street is the highlight for many visitors to the region. Settled in 1839 by Prussian Lutherans bravely seeking religious freedom on the other side of the world, Hahndorf's picturesque colonial charm remains remarkably intact. Located just 25 minutes from Adelaide, Hahndorf is Australia’s oldest surviving German settlement and still has a strong German flavour most evident in the smallgoods outlets, bakeries, pubs, restaurants and cafes that line the bustling main street. While its proximity to Adelaide makes Hahndorf a perennial favourite as a day trip destination, most visitors wish they had longer to explore all the township has to offer so consider accommodation from the wide range available.
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Lismore Memorial Baths
The Lismore Memorial Baths were reopened in September 2005, after more than two years of redevelopment work. The multi-million dollar aquatics facility sets a new benchmark on the Northern Rivers. The Memorial Baths not only provides a great place for families and the community to enjoy their leisure time, they also cater for the more serious swimmers. The facility meets international specifications and is capable of hosting major events. State of the art equipment includes an electronic timing system available for major swimming carnivals and a moveable boom for short-course events and multi-programming.
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Portarlington Mill
Located just 300 metres from the beach, the Portarlington Mill was constructed in 1856 with rough local sandstone and Baltic Pine floors. The interior spaces are quintessential mid 19th century industrial style: large open spaces with heavy timber posts and beams enclosed by natural stone. The Mill is one of the few remaining and preserved Victorian flour mills.
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Guadalcanal American Memorial
The World War II Guadalcanal American Memorial is located on Skyline Drive overlooking the town of Honiara, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. It was built through the joint efforts of ABMC and the Guadalcanal-Solomon Islands Memorial Commission. It honours those Americans and its allies who lost their lives during the Guadalcanal Campaign of World War II (August 7, 1942, to February 9, 1943). The memorial consists of a 4-foot square, 24-foot tall pylon on which is inscribed: This memorial has been erected by the United States of America in humble tribute to its sons and its allies who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the liberation of the Solomon Islands 1942-1943. There are four directional walls pointing to the four major battle areas. Inscribed on these walls are a description of the battles and a listing of the U.S. and Allied ships that were lost.
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Lalbagh Fort
The fort of Aurangabad, popularly known as the Lalbagh Fort, was built in 1678 AD by the then Viceroy of Bengal Prince Mohammad Azam, son of the Mughal Emperor Aurangazeb. The fort has a three storied structure with slender minarets at the South Gate. It has many hidden passages and a mosque of massive structure. Outstanding among the monuments of the Lalbagh Fort are the Tomb of Pari Bibi (Fairy lady) and Audience room and Hummam Khana (bathing place) of Nawab Shaista Khan, now housing a museum. The fort was the scene of bloody battle during the first war of independence (1857) when 260 spays stationed here backed by the people revolted against British forces. It is one of the great historical places of Mughal era. A small museum is there in this fort where you will find the clothes and weapons of the Mughols. These are a small 3-domed mosque, the mausoleum of Bibi Pari the reputed daughter of Nawab Shaista Khan and the Hammam and Audience Hall of the Governor. The main purpose of this fort was to provide a defensive enclosure of the palatial edifices of the interior and as such was a type of palace-fortress rather than a siege fort.
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Warrook Farm
Warrook is living history, a full working farm over 100 years old. Take a step back in time, channel your inner ‘farmer’ self as you experience a range of hands on activities and demonstrations at Warrook – a genuine Aussie farm experience!
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Australian War Memorial
The Australian War Memorial is pleased to be the recipient of TripAdvisor’s Travellers’ Choice Award for the number one landmark in both Australia and the South Pacific for 2016.
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Parliament House
See democracy in action at Australia’s iconic Parliament House high on Capital Hill. During Question Time see the country’s elected politicians make the big decisions on behalf of the nation. Take a guided tour, visit the popular Queen's Terrace Cafe and view historic documents and see an impressive collection of Australian art including one of the world’s largest tapestries based on an Arthur Boyd design.
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Churchill Island Heritage Farm
Experience a piece of Victoria’s heritage on this historic island, where you can enjoy a relaxing stroll through the fragrant cottage gardens and lawns. Coastline walks offer magnificent views of Phillip Island and Western Port, while the restored farmhouse and cottages provide a glimpse into the past lives of early Australian settlers and past farming practices. Churchill Island, just off the coast of Phillip Island holds an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. The site of the first European agricultural pursuits in Victoria, the island has been farmed since the 1850’s and in 1872 was purchased by Samuel Amess, former Mayor of Melbourne. This tiny island of 57 hectares is now open to the public as an historic working farm that boasts significant natural and cultural values with world-class wetlands, ancient Moonah trees, heritage gardens and historic buildings.