ParksandGardens in Peterborough

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United Kingdom
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Elton Hall and Gardens
The Hall has been home to the Proby family since 1660. It is an enchanting house which has evolved throughout the centuries. Every room contains magnificent treasures, from late 15th century Old Masters to Reynolds, Constable and remarkable Victorian painters such as Millais and Alma Tadema. Each generation has collected books and there are three libraries containing over 10,000 books. One of the most remarkable is Henry VIII’s prayer book with inscriptions by him and his three children. The garden has been lovingly restored over the last 35 years with mature topiary, a Gothic Orangery and billowing flower borders set between immaculately cut hedges.
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Railworld Wildlife Haven
The Railworld Wildlife Haven is testament to what can be achieved when volunteers, companies, groups and individuals work together for a common goal – Encouraging Environmental Awareness. Rev Richard Paten our founder chair and life long volunteer – brought the land over 30 years ago and we have raised funds to create what we have today.... We have never had any core funding, but we have won six major UK Environmental Awards and one Worldwide Award from Caterpillar. We are located alongside Peterborough Nene Valley Station – There is ample car parking and we are easily accessible, 15 minutes walk from Peterborough’s main railway station. Railworld has 2,000 sqft of model railway, with hands-on exhibits. We have the unique hover train RTV 31.
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Peckover House and Gardens
Peckover House lies at the heart of the North Brink in Wisbech, one of Britain's most perfect streetscapes. From the 1790s it was home to the Peckovers, a fascinating dynasty of Quaker bankers, collectors and philanthropists who created the spacious Victorian garden that lies behind the house. The majority of the indigenous Peckover collection was sold during a two day sale after the death of Alexandrina Peckover in 1948, but the house is still full of interesting artefacts, objects and stories.
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Burghley House
Built and mostly designed by William Cecil, Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I, between 1555 and 1587, the main part of the House has 35 major rooms on the ground and first floors.
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University of Cambridge Museums
The University of Cambridge has 8 museums and the Cambridge University Botanic Garden, which when combined, has the country's highest concentration of internationally important collections outside of London.
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Cambridge University Botanic Garden
Since its opening in 1846, Cambridge University Botanic Garden (CUBG) has been an inspiration for gardeners, an exciting introduction to the natural world for families and an oasis for all its visitors. Supporting leading scientific research and welcoming 300,000 visitors a year, CUBG is one of the largest University-owned botanic gardens in the world. The Garden’s living plant collection of over 8,000 species is spread across 40 acres of landscaped gardens. The collection, which includes iconic, threatened and endangered trees and plants, supports University research which focusses on meeting many of the world’s greatest future challenges (such as food security, climate change and medicine). The Garden also inspires schools, the local community and visitors from around the world about the importance of plants and plant science, horticulture and the joy of gardening.
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Naturescape Wildflower Farm
Our wild flower farm visitor centre which we believe is the first of its kind in the UK, is situated on Coach Gap Lane, Langar, Notts. It Opened in 1990 and fulfills our objective to provide a site open for demonstration, information and personal Read More
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Victoria Park
Victoria Park is a fine green space next to the University of Leicester campus. The centrepiece of the park is the magnificent memorial arch, built to commemorate the dead of the First World War. The arch was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, as were the beautiful wrought iron gates at the parks Peace Walk and London Road entrances. The area served as the city's racecourse until 1883; upon the racing find a new home at Leicester Racecourse in Oadby, the area was transformed and is now a peaceful retreat from the buzz of the city. The park has areas of formal flowerbeds as well as winding pathways shaded by avenues of trees– perfect for finding some shade and enjoying a picnic or a good book on a summer’s day. For more active visitors, the park is home to a bowling green, croquet area, 4 tennis courts, football and rugby pitches, a floodlit Astro pitch and an outdoor gym.
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Belgrave Hall & Gardens
Belgrave Hall is a historic house, providing an oasis of peace and quiet in a busy city. The hall was built in the early 18th century in what was then a small village three miles from the town of Leicester. Now city traffic passes, almost unnoticed, just beyond the garden walls. Edmund Cradock, a hosiery merchant, built Belgrave Hall but died soon after its completion. The Hall has had several owners over the years, including John Ellis – a wealthy businessman who was responsible for bringing the railways to Leicester. Visitors can explore Belgrave Hall and the beautiful surrounding gardens on special event days. From April to September the gardens are open every Wednesday and the first full weekend of the month, with additional special events open to the public. Visit the website for more details on specific open days.
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Abbey Park
Hugging the banks of the River Soar in the north of the city is Abbey Park – a beautiful green space to relax and admire Leicester’s riverside scenery. The park has a choice of activities to keep the whole family entertained. The boating lake in the centre of the park offers hire of both rowing and pedalo boats – fun for adults and children alike! On a summer’s day, relax and pedal your way around the beautiful lake in the centre of the park, enjoying the sweeping views of serene parkland all around. Heritage lovers will enjoy a stroll around the remains of the twelfth century Leicester Abbey and the ruins of Cavendish House, a 17th century mansion. The Abbey was founded by the second Earl of Leicester, Robert le Bossu. It became one of the wealthiest Augustinian abbeys in the country, but closed in 1538 when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Whilst converting the overgrown abbey grounds into a public excavations revealed the remains of the abbey church and the other main building ranges, which can be seen in the park today. Those looking to get active can take advantage of the parks many sporting facilities, including a bowling green, five hard surface tennis courts, orienteering courses, a lavender maze and Ping! table tennis tables – perfect for those looking to try something new or get in some extra practise. Pets Corner is a favourite with all visitors to the park – an area to interact with a variety of small, domesticated animals. The area includes an aviary with a collection of exotic birds, as well as small enclosures housing hens, guinea pigs, rabbits, goats and pygmy goats.
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Bradgate Park
Bradgate Park was first enclosed as a deer park around 800 years ago. It provides 830 acres of publicly accessible countryside close to Leicester City Centre. The Park offers a wild and rugged landscape with dramatic rocky outcrops and gnarled old oak trees, many of which are well over 500 years old. The landscape offers some of the finest views, and is rich in change throughout the seasons.
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Reg Taylor's Garden Centre
Walk into Reg Taylor's Garden Centre and you enter into a different world. It's not just a quality Garden Centre wonderfully set out over a 25-acre site, it's a place where there is the widest choice and most incredibly beautiful things for your garden and for your home. It's maintained and created each day by the Taylor Family themselves who have grown the business for well over 70 years and today are passionately dedicated to being assistance, advise and help in whatever you need to make your garden and home special. To visit Reg Taylor's is to have an amazing experience, you’ll want to come back again and again throughout the changing seasons and the year ahead. At the heart of the business, the hands-on approach and knowledge of the Taylor family is evident in the enormous choice and quality of Nursery Stock at very competitive prices. From Bedding Plants, Houseplants, Fruit Trees, Soft Fruit, Ornamental Trees to Roses, Alpines, Semi Mature Trees, Perennials, Climbers, Shrubs, Conifers, the list goes on!
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Ickworth House Park & Gardens
A taste of classical Italy brought to Suffolk – discover the spirit of Ickworth. There’s so much to see indoors and outdoors at this beautiful National Trust country estate with great visitor facilities including ample parking, West Wing café, Porter’s Lodge café, children’s play area, plant centre and gift shop. Just four miles from Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.
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Pensthorpe Natural Park
The former home of BBC Springwatch, Pensthorpe Natural Park is a modern-day nature reserve with a focus on inspiring the next generation to enjoy wildlife and the great outdoors. With its diverse attractions and activities, it offers a fully immersive day out for families, bird watchers, wildlife enthusiasts and garden lovers. Explore 700 acres of woodland walks, nature trails, lakes and a variety of habitats teeming with wildlife including wetlands, woodlands, farmland and grassland. Enjoy the tranquillity of five stunning gardens, encounter Pensthorpe’s hugely popular Flamingo flock and cute ducks that will feed out of the palm of your hand and hop on the behind-the-scenes Pensthorpe Explorer* to discover the secret side of the Wensum Valley. Adventurous families can take a walk on the wild side and join Hootz the owl on a journey around his magical outdoor adventure play area, WildRootz and the award winning indoor play area, Hootz House, which is perfect even on rainy days and comes complete with soft play for the under 5s. During the school holidays hands-on activities such as wildlife spotting, pond dipping, den building and nature-inspired crafts enable visitors to get closer to nature.
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Caludon Castle Park
Caludon Castle Park is a hidden gem nestled Coventry. The park is a special place as it houses Coventry's only castle remains, that of Caludon Castle set in a beautiful park land.
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Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens
These 10 acre walled gardens (listed Grade II) are a rare example of formal English garden design. They are being restored as near as possible to the period 1680 to 1762 when the Bridgeman family moved to Weston Park. The house was built in 1599 by Sir Edward Devereux and extended by Sir John Bridgeman I about 100 years later. The Gardens were developed by several generations of the Bridgeman Family (later to become the Earls of Bradford) reaching peaks of excellence around 1760 and 1900. The Gardens fell into decline during the middle part of the twentieth century until they were rescued by the Trust in 1985. The Holly Maze is a distorted mirror image of the one at Hampton Court Palace designed by George London and Henry Wise.
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The Bishops Garden
A popular place for many years and still a favourite, attracting visitors yearly is the Bishop’s garden. A four acre walled garden dating back to the 12th century in the grounds of the Bishop’s House.
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Akamba Hertiage Centre
Discover the spirit of Africa at Akamba Hertiage Centre in Solihull. The centre houses two acres of exotic plantlife and palms, stunning lifesize animal scultptures and the new African Bird walk where you can see some of the world's most colourful birds up close. Be sure to check out the jungle beer garden and tribal restaurant for some premier African and Caribbean cuisine.
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Pleasure Garden
If you’re looking for things to do with the kids, take a ride on the Miniature Train to Blenheim Palace’s Pleasure Gardens. Explore the Marlborough Hedge Maze, delight in the abundance of wildlife in the Butterfly House, burn off some energy in the Adventure Playground and enjoy a relaxing moment amongst the soothing scent of the Lavender Garden. Head to the Pleasure Gardens Deli for delicious hot and cold snacks, handmade pizzas, soups, salads, ice cream and a selection of healthy choices for children. In the summer months, visitors can enjoy sizzling sausages and beautiful burgers cooked to order in front of you on the Blenheim Palace BBQ. The Gardens Shop is where you can find a fantastic range of children’s toys, books, games and souvenirs alongside a selection of gardening products.
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Cannon Hill Park
There are 5 tennis courts, a bowling green and a mini-golf course all located in the central area between the Midland Arts Centre and the Russell Road car park.
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Birmingham Botanical Gardens
The gardens cover 15 acres. The Tropical House has a lily pool and lush tropical vegetation. Palms, tree ferns and orchids are displayed in the Sub-tropical House. Outside there is colourful bedding on the Terrace and a tour of the Gardens includes: Rhododendron walks, Rose Garden, Rock Garden, a collection of over 200 trees, Herb and Cottage Gardens, Museum, children's adventure playground, children's discovery garden, aviaries and National Bonsai collection. Sculpture Trail, plant centre, gift shop and refreshment pavilion.
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Hyde Park
Set right in the heart of London, Hyde Park offers both world-class events and concerts together with plenty of quiet places to relax and unwind. Dip your toes in the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain, brave an open water swim in the Serpentine, or just admire the views across the lake from a waterside café. Have a go at boating, tennis, horse riding, or join the many joggers, walkers and cyclists enjoying the open air. Hyde Park has a long history as a site of protest, and still hosts rallies and marches today. Visit Speakers’ Corner on a Sunday morning to hear people from all walks of life share their views. Hyde Park is one of London’s eight Royal Parks and covers an area of 350 acres.
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Braywick Nature Centre
Based at Braywick Nature Centre, the Royal Borough's Countryside Service promotes awareness of the natural environment through our programme of events, walks and talks, and providing education sessions and advice to schools and other groups.
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Bray Lake Watersports
Take part in a variety of water sports at Bray Lake! Enjoy Stand Up Paddle Boarding, Windsurfing, Kayaking, Dinghy Sailing and Open Water Swimming. The Centre is open 7 days a week and offers equipment hire, holiday courses and private tuition.
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Frogmore House
Set amidst the extensive Home Park of Windsor Castle, Frogmore House is surrounded by fine and picturesque gardens. The house dates from the 1680s and was purchased for Queen Charlotte in 1792. Here the Queen was able to indulge her love of botany and laid out the garden with many rare and unusual plants. At one time the house was the home of Queen Victoria's mother, the Duchess of Kent. After her death, her son-in-law, Prince Albert, commissioned the building of an elegant mausoleum to hold her remains. Queen Victoria was particularly fond of Frogmore's peaceful ambience and it became her favourite retreat. Victoria and Albert's love of Frogmore lead them to break with tradition and build themselves a much larger and grander mausoleum for themselves. Favoured also by King George V and Queen Mary, they used Frogmore for entertaining during Ascot Week. Today, with its handsome house and tranquil gardens, it is easy to imagine the love Frogmore inspired in its former residents.
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National Trust Runnymede
Seen by many as the birthplace of modern democracy, this picturesque open landscape beside the Thames was witness to King John's historic sealing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215. Today Runnymede is the perfect place to relax outdoors or to pause and reflect on the history of the struggle for freedom. As well as a monument to the democratic legacy of the Magna Carta, you'll find further memorials to John F. Kennedy and the Commonwealth Air Forces. There are two art installations to be discovered in the meadows. The Jurors by Hew Locke is a collection of 12 bronze chairs sat in the meadow, each intricately decorated with designs depicting current and past struggles relating to democracy and freedom. Writ in Water is a major architectural artwork by Mark Wallinger, in collaboration with Studio Octopi. The large scale circular building features a labyrinth style entrance leading to a central chamber, where a pool sits below a central opening, reflecting in light from the outside. Celebrating the enduring significance of Magna Carta, this unique piece of artwork offers space for reflection and contemplation.
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The Savill Garden
The Savill Garden is one of Britain’s greatest ornamental gardens. It never fails to charm visitors who come to explore its 35 acres of contemporary and classically designed gardens and exotic woodland. Developed under the patronage of Kings and Queens, The Savill Garden was created in the 1930s by Sir Eric Savill. The Savill Garden is a place of constant discovery, and of interlocking gardens, containing distinctive areas such as Spring Wood, The Summer Wood, The Hidden Gardens, The Summer Gardens, The Glades, Autumn Wood, The Azalea Walks and The New Zealand Garden. The Savill Garden mixes native and exotic species and has bred many important garden hybrids. Each ‘garden within a garden’ has its own attractions, and the gardens are ever-changing with every season bringing new colour and interest to delight the visitor. The Rose Garden takes a fresh and contemporary approach to display roses. The design creates an intense sensory experience with roses especially chosen for their scent, strong colours and repeats flowering. Visitors enjoy the perfume at its best, together with stunning views, from a walkway which appears to ‘float’ above the Rose Garden.
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Windsor Great Park
Windsor Great Park covers 4,800 acres, parts of which are open to the public. Its present area was determined in the 1360s and was popular with Saxon kings as a hunting forest. The park is shrouded in mystery and legend and for over 1,000 years the story of Herne the Hunter has been told. His ghost still appears wearing the antlers of a stag, riding a phantom black stallion at the head of a pack of black hounds. He appears to warn of times of trouble and gallops through Windsor Great Park only to disappear into thin air. The park today is the perfect place for picnics, eating, shopping, running, walking, cycling, horse riding and fishing. Families will love the children's play area near The Savill Garden.
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Cotswold Wildlife Park
A fantastic day out for all the family. Stroll around the Cotswold Wildlife Park & Gardens, enjoying uninterrupted views of the animals, so it feels as though you are in a wild setting. Watch the daily Lemur & Penguin Talks, take a ride on Bella the Train (extra cost) or explore the large adventure playground, with treehouses and slides. Cotswold Wildlife Park & Gardens is home to more than 260 species of animals and 120 acres of beautiful parkland. Watch Rhinos graze on the lawns in front of the Gothic Manor House. Walk up the Giraffe walkway and get eye-to-eye with these amazing creatures or explore the Old Walled Garden’s Tropical House with free-roaming sloths, birds and bats. Watch the Penguin’s being fed (daily at 11 am & 3 pm) and walk with Lemurs in their free-roaming Madagascar Exhibit.
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Restoration House
Fabled city mansion, stayed in by Charles II on eve of his restoration and the Satis House of Great Expectations. Superbly poetic interiors with a wonderful collection of English furniture and paintings, including several Gainsboroughs and Reynolds and rare Constable portraits. A good collection of English pottery and treen. The deliciously maintained twin-walled gardens of an acre now complemented by the ongoing restoration of monumental renaissance garden.
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Yorkshire Sculpture Park
Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) is the leading international centre for modern and contemporary sculpture. It is an independent charitable trust and registered museum situated in the 500-acre, 18th-century Bretton Hall estate in West Yorkshire. Founded in 1977 by Executive Director Peter Murray, YSP was the first sculpture park in the UK, and is the largest of its kind in Europe, providing the only place in the world to see Barbara Hepworth’s The Family of Man in its entirety alongside a significant collection of sculpture, including bronzes by Henry Moore, and site-specific works by Andy Goldsworthy, David Nash and James Turrell.
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Lotherton Hall
Enjoy a fantastic day out at Lotherton Hall, a great day out for the family. This charming Edwardian country estate once home to the Gascoigne family offers you plenty of choice things to do and see. Visit the house to see what life was like in Edwardian times, go back in time by dressing up in our children’s area, or travel around the world with the new interactive ‘The Gascoignes Abroad’. Make sure to take a stroll around the fabulous bird garden and see owls, flamingos and much more! Plus walk around the stunning grounds and visit the historic stables and carriage displays. Also, there is a choice of two play areas including the woodland play area for older kids.
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Askham Bryan Wildlife Park
Askham Bryan Wildlife and Conservation Park is a new wildlife park at Askham Bryan College. The park is located in the beautiful arboretum, with animals dotted around the beautiful woodlands. Come and see amazing animals from fish to frogs and monkeys to meerkats.
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Goddards House and Garden
On the edge of the racecourse, just a stone’s throw away from the centre of York, sits Goddards, the home of the Terry family (think chocolate orange.) Noel Goddard Terry was the owner of the famous chocolate-making company Terry’s of York. His family house was designed by architect Walter Brierly in the Arts and Crafts style, with four acres of gardens designed by George Dillistone. Relax in Terry family home, recreated with a warm atmosphere where you can sit down and pour yourself a sherry in the Drawing Room, or take a leisurely stroll around the garden rooms. At Christmas time the house is dressed as the Terry family might have once enjoyed it and you're invited to make yourself at home. There's a special pre-bookable lunch on the menu in the Dining Room for seasonal get together with friends and family. The house has selected rooms displayed to give glimpses into the family home and working chocolate factory. The garden includes yew-hedged garden rooms, bowling green, wilderness gardens and plants for every season and is an oasis for wildlife. New additions include an orchard and fragrant garden, following the original planting styles from archive plans. Families can enjoy the games and play as the Terry family once did.
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Fletcher Moss Park
This 21-acre park was acquired as a gift from Alderman Fletcher Moss in 1914. Renowned for their botanical beauty, the gardens contain many antiquated and unusual plants and flowers. The park has retained many of its original features such as the rock and heather gardens, and there is an Alpine house in the gardens adjacent to Fletcher Moss. Together they form a picturesque, tranquil haven for visitors. The park also provides an excellent setting for the annual summer Park Play Performance.
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Roundhay Park
Roundhay Park in Leeds, is one of the biggest city parks in Europe. It has over 700 acres of parkland, lakes, woodland and gardens which are owned by Leeds City Council. The park is one of the most popular in Europe. In the park you can find an abundance of wildlife including woodpeckers, common warblers in spring and summer, mute swans, visiting whooper swans, great-crested grebes and herons. Mammals include foxes, roe deer, voles, moles, rabbits and grey squirrels. There are good crops of crocus in spring, followed by daffodils and bluebells and gorse is present in the northern side of the park.
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Northwood Trail
The Northwood Fairy Sanctuary is intended to delight adults as well as children. It is set within 100 acres of glorious woodland with 1.5kms of imaginative nature trails winding through. Be inspired by a willow walled maze, a large collection of fairy doors on trees, fairy treehouses connected with rope bridges, a tree stump village, giant mushroom ring, Elven thrones and a natural play area, with sandpit, mud kitchen and den building. It is a natural rustic attraction, sympathetic to its woodland surroundings and perfect for reconnecting children and adults to the freedom and magic of the natural world - all year around. Inside there is a unique Fairy Museum, largely the work and collection of Professor Harvey John Howland, an eminent fairy collector and a fellow of the New Society of Arcane and Natural History, connected to both the Pre Raphaelite Brotherhood and New England Transcendentalists. The museum is based in Professor Howland’s old studio and houses some of his writings, drawings and curiosities. The bulk of the collection is made up of carefully restored fairy clothes, shoes, crowns houses and other stunning artefacts. This collection of exquisite miniatures is unlike anything else in the UK and will inspire and inform both children and adults.